Is it really Night of the Living Dead meets Snakes on a Plane? I’m not sure whether a yes to that would be good news or bad news for you, but here comes an exploratory attempt at an answer involving the movie: Flight of the Living Dead: Outbreak On A Plane.

Directed by Scott Thomas this movie is immediately a tongue-in-cheek concept involving an outbreak of zombies on a flight to Paris. Yes, the Undead are at 30,000 feet. It is the sort of movie on the rental shelf that certain people are going to giggle and snatch up immediately and then others are going to by-pass without even a second glance. The people marketing the picture already have those gigglers, so the challenge is to somehow draw in a few of those not interested via word of mouth, astounding movie reviews, or if they were really smart a booze tie-in that gets people drunk first.

If you were one of those that thought Snakes On a Plane ended up being more of a studio sell-out and not campy enough, Flight of the Living Dead seems tailor made for you; though really after the first half an hour passed I was looking for it to be less mainstream even. The usage of digital effects give the film a cool enough look except when applied to the movements of the zombies themselves; in such a confined space there did not need to be effects added to simulate speed, just ends up looking like the rewind or fast forward button got pushed for a bit. It took a good 30-45 minutes for the action to really step up, so essentially if you’re in this for the novelty of it all you could skip to that point of the film and just enjoy without knowing any of the characters on a more personal level. The music is standard guitar riffs when zombies attack, which is as it should be I say. Series such as House of the Dead should take notes that when you are having a low-budget zombie action piece you need jut random guitar sounds for music; need to rock!

It is all up to the cast to keep the viewer interested on this film. The plot and such is downright silly and the mechanics are all re-hashed samples from other films, so we need to like the characters. I sound off with applause for whoever cast this movie, they did it perfectly for what it is. Kevin J. O’Conner is the stand out performance as a wise-mouth con artist being transported by a law official played by David Chisum. O’Conner you may recognize from the Clive Barker horror film Lord of Illusions in which he plays magician Swann.(which is an awesome movie) The interactions between O’Conner and Chisum are swell, and then throw in Richard Tyson as a TSA Agent and you have fun with character chemistry; while in a cheesy horror film setting. Tyson was of course the bad guy from Kindergarten Cop and has probably been mistaken for Val Kilmar more often than not. Other notable performances are put in by: Kristen Kerr, Erick Avari, and Raymond J. Berry. The rest of the cast does consist of some recognizable character actor faces, but listing them would be just as pointless as having cast big names into those disposable roles at all. Yes, bad acting IS good acting in these films.

It takes a while to get into, but the last half of the film when all of the plane is under attack by zombies is a fun treat for those who enjoy B-movie horror. Zombie fans can embrace this as more of the same stuff they are used to, but can factor in the quirky setting and title as making it a stand out in their collection. The answer to the opening questions is indeed basically yes, if you’re a giggler I say grab it, if not, you’re not going to miss anything, but then again throwing a B-movie party can be fun for every clique of people on occasion.